Jason Hayes Foundation

Grants will be made available for those non-profit organizations serving the children of Massachusetts.      Grants applications that will be considered for funding include those who offer direct services to the population we serve.      Programs that we typically like are

  • Training programs for professionals who work with behaviorally challenged children
  • Organizations that provide services for behaviorally challenged children, especially those in the foster care system
  • Organizations that endeavor to support those aging out of the foster care system

The JASON HAYES FOUNDATION is pleased to announce that again this year we will provide a limited number of scholarships for summer camp.     The population we serve includes those children who have been or are in the foster care system in Massachusetts.    We prefer camps that have  counselors with specific expertise or training in serving children with behavioral and emotional challenges and camps with a primary focus in remediation of these challenges.   All applications must be completed in full and filled out online.   A supporting letter from the child’s social worker or therapist must be forwarded to [email protected] Such letter can also  be faxed to (781)232-0312. 

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The JASON HAYES FOUNDATION is pleased to announce that again this year we will provide a limited number of scholarships for summer camp.     The population we serve includes those children who have been or are in the foster care system in Massachusetts.    We prefer camps that have  counselors with specific expertize or training in serving children with behavioral and emotional challenges and camps with a primary focus in remediating these challenges.   All applications must be completed in full and a supporting letter from the child’s social worker or therapist must be forwarded to [email protected] Such letter can be faxed to (781)232-0312. 

We are now accepting grant requests.   The deadline for 2014 requests is 12/01/2014.     Proposals that will be considered are those for workshops and/or print materials that seek to inform  educators and other providers,  and to advocate  for children who have behavior problems that speak to their early adverse life experiences.    We also will support programs that seek to advocate and support those children who are aging out of the foster care system.

The Jason Hayes Foundation is now accepting applications for Summer Camp Programs.     The deadline for submitting applications is June 27 or when we have exhausted the committed funds.      The camper must either be in the foster care system or had been in the past.     Priority and funding is granted on a first come first serve basis; however, priority is given to those campers attending camps specifically geared for children with behavioral or emotional challenges.

Children who have been exposed to traumatic experiences in their young lives will feel the effects and suffer the consequences through their lifetime.  The visible scars may have healed; the memories may be long ago hidden in the recesses of the mind.  Because we cannot see, because the child may not consciously remember, does not mean damage does not exist; it is there, and it will show itself in behaviors that can be misdiagnosed or ignored.   Research has proven that there is a very strong correlation between the early mistreatment of children and later psychiatric problems.    More recent investigations have also shown strong evidence that abuse occurring during the critical years when neural pathways and brain structure is being formed, such stress can induce changed in the structure and function of the brain.

We are talking about children who have suffered deprivation and trauma during the bonding and separation phases of their development

Children who experience trauma and/or chronic or severe stress in early childhood are particularly vulnerable to issues with attention and learning.

Traumatized children may express their suffering in a way that evokes frustration and anger. The child may be reacting to those in authority.    People in authority violated their trust in the past. The student may be projecting feelings and anger that is meant for authority figures from the past.    This behavior is known as “projective identification”.

The behaviors presented by this child are not willful disobedience or meaningless disrespect or anger.   The behaviors are the symptoms of, and communication about, the very early disconnect that occurred when this child was a victim and suffered the psychological, emotional and resultant physiological wounds as a result of early trauma.

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